Burning incense is good for the soul

I’ve always loved incense — when I was 6 I got in big trouble for burning incense cones (without a protective stand) on top of my antique dresser.  I wasn’t deterred by the scolding, I’ve been a fan ever since.  I’ve tried for years to duplicate the exotic smoky smell that emanates from Buddhist temples… always to no avail…

Now, according to an article on the Science Daily website, a team of international scientists has found evidence that burning resin from the Boswellia plant (commonly known as frankincense) can alter brain chemistry in a way that alleviates anxiety and depression.


From sciencedaily.com:

“In spite of information stemming from ancient texts, constituents of Bosweilla had not been investigated for psychoactivity,” said Raphael Mechoulam, one of the research study’s co-authors. “We found that incensole acetate, a Boswellia resin constituent, when tested in mice lowers anxiety and causes antidepressive-like behavior. Apparently, most present day worshipers assume that incense burning has only a symbolic meaning.”

To determine incense’s psychoactive effects, the researchers administered incensole acetate to mice. They found that the compound significantly affected areas in brain areas known to be involved in emotions as well as in nerve circuits that are affected by current anxiety and depression drugs. Specifically, incensole acetate activated a protein called TRPV3, which is present in mammalian brains and also known to play a role in the perception of warmth of the skin. When mice bred without this protein were exposed to incensole acetate, the compound had no effect on their brains.

“Perhaps Marx wasn’t too wrong when he called religion the opium of the people: morphine comes from poppies, cannabinoids from marijuana, and LSD from mushrooms; each of these has been used in one or another religious ceremony.” said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. “Studies of how those psychoactive drugs work have helped us understand modern neurobiology. The discovery of how incensole acetate, purified from frankincense, works on specific targets in the brain should also help us understand diseases of the nervous system. This study also provides a biological explanation for millennia-old spiritual practices that have persisted across time, distance, culture, language, and religion–burning incense really does make you feel warm and tingly all over!”


Interesting… very interesting…  I’m off to buy some frankincense, anyone else want some while I’m out?

 

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